English

English

India's crows have recently begun to disappear

After the disappearance of sparrows from the country’s urban landscape, the focus has now turned to the population of the common Indian house crow. Paul R. Greenough, professor of Modern Indian History and Community and Behavioural Health, University of Iowa, the U.S., who is studying the decline of common Indian house crows or Corvus splendens, delivered two talks during his visit to Mysuru last month.

Freshwater invertebrates and fish species in New Zealand are at risk of extinction

Most of New Zealand's native freshwater species are at risk of extinction as water quality faces "serious pressures", a Government report says. The report by the Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand, titled Our fresh water environment 2017, found nearly three quarters of native freshwater fish species are threatened by or at risk of extinction, as well as a third of native freshwater invertebrates and a third of native freshwater plants. It found nitrogen levels were worsening at more than half of the measured sites.

Italian agronomists show that sustainable maize production is possible without neonicotinoids

In the early 2000s, Italian beekeepers began to report bee mortality events linked to maize sowing. Evidence pointed to three neonicotinoids (imidacloprid, clothianidin, thiamethoxam) and a phenylpyrazole (fipronil) used for seed dressing that were dispersed in the environment during sowing. Following these events and based on the precautionary principle, in September 2008, the Italian Ministry of Health suspended these four active ingredients as maize seed dressing.

Declining numbers of Blue-tailed bee-eater worry conservationists

Once sighted in the thousands, the Blue-tailed bee-eater is a sparsely spotted bird these days. Bird watchers and photographers say their numbers have significantly declined from thousands to a few hundreds in the last five years. In South India, the tiny beauty is endemic to Chandagala, a village on the banks of River Cauvery and close to the historic town of Srirangapatna in Mandya district. The Blue-tailed bee-eater (Merops philippinus) is migratory by nature. The bird is found in peninsular parts of the country.

Cod fishing catches plummet in waters off New England

The cod isn't so sacred in New England anymore. The fish-and-chips staple was once a critical piece of New England's fishing industry, but catch is plummeting to all-time lows in the region. In Maine, which is home to the country's second-largest Atlantic cod fishery, the dwindling catch has many wondering if cod fishing is a thing of the past. "It's going to be more and more difficult for people to make this work," said Maggie Raymond, executive director of the Associated Fisheries of Maine. State records say 2016 was historically bad for cod fishing in Maine.

US surface waters are contaminated with neonicotinoid insecticides, with catastrophic effects on the insect world

Data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Pesticide National Synthesis Project, show that use of neonicotinoids in agriculture rose from about 150 metric tons (all imidacloprid) in the late 1990s and early 2000s to between 510 and 625 tons in 2004. From 2004 to 2007, these figures nearly doubled, and in 2012, according to USGS data, between 2,677 and 2,819 tons were used. Data for 2013 and 2014 are still preliminary but suggest the numbers have continued to rise.

Bird Population Faces Crisis In The Vermont Forest

Vermont is famous for its natural and mesmerizing landscape that includes a big forest. Unfortunately, a recent report has revealed the decrement of the bird population there. ABC News reported a sharp decline of 14.2 percent in the bird population over the last 25 years in the Vermont forest. The latest study has unveiled this crucial fact. Several rare and common bird species exist in the said forest. Among them, some species solely depend on the flying insects and they form a major portion of the bird population.

River Irwell suffers serious pollution for the second time in three weeks

The River Irwell appears to have been polluted for a second time in three weeks. Countless fish and insects died following reports a pesticide which was poured down a drain and devastated a 25-mile stretch of the river from Rawtenstall into Manchester city centre earlier this month. Now a second incident has been reported on a section of the Irwell north of Bury. The incident has been reported to the Environment Agency. Mike Duddy, chief executive of the Mersey Basin Rivers Trust, said virtually no river life had survived the previous incident.

Surface waters in the Salinas and Santa Maria regions of California are contaminated with imidacloprid

Surface water monitoring for pesticides in agricultural areas of California is one of the California Department of Pesticide Regulation’s (CDPR’s) key environmental monitoring activities. The Salinas, Santa Maria and Imperial valleys have previously been designated as high priority areas for long-term surface water monitoring due to high pesticide use. This 2013 study is a continuation of the agricultural monitoring project.

Imidacloprid the most frequently detected insecticide in surface waters in eastern Massachusetts during 2009 and 2010

Pesticide occurrence was determined in two suburban surface waters in eastern Massachusetts, USA during 2009 and 2010. Out of 118 collected samples, 45 samples showed detections of one or more target pesticides. Among the herbicides, 2,4-D was the most frequently detected and imidacloprid was the most frequently detected insecticide. Regulatory phaseout of chlorpyrifos and diazinon from residential use by 2004 was reflected in the results by the absence of chlorpyrifos detections and lower detection frequencies of diazinon.